Hearing the shape of a simplicial complex

A finite abstract simplicial complex has a natural connection Laplacian which is unimodular. The energy of the complex is the sum of the Green function entries. We see that the energy is also the number of positive eigenvalues minus the number of negative eigenvalues. One can therefore hear the Euler characteristic. Does the spectrum determine the complex?

Space and Particles

Elements in the strong ring within the Stanley-Reisner ring still can be seen as geometric objects for which mathematical theorems known in topology hold. But there is also arithemetic. We remark that the multiplicative primes in the ring are the simplicial complexes. The Sabidussi theorem imlies that additive primes (particles) have a unique prime factorization (into elementary particles).

The finitist bunker

As Goedel has shown, mathematics can not tame the danger that some inconsistency develops within the system. One can build bunkers but never will be safe. But the danger is not as big as history has shown. Any crisis which developed has been very fruitful and led to new mathematics. (Zeno paradox->calculus, Epimenids paradox ->Goedel, irrationality crisis ->number fields etc.

A ring of networks

Assuming the join operation to be the addition, we found a multiplication which produces a ring of oriented networks. We have a commutative ring in which the empty graph is the zero element and the one point graph is the one element. This ring contains the usual integers as a subring. In the form of positive and negative complete subgraphs.

Arithmetic with networks

The join operation on graphs produces a monoid on which one can ask whether there exists an analogue of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic. The join operation mirrors the corresponding join operation in the continuum. It leaves spheres invariant. We prove the existence of infinitely many primes in each dimension and also establish Euclid’s lemma, the existence of prime factorizations. An important open question is whether there is a fundamental theorem of arithmetic for graphs.

The Unimodularity Theorem for CW Complexes

The unimodularity theorem equates a fredholm determinant with a product of indices. It originally was formulated for graphs or simplicial complexes. It turns out to be valid for more general structures, generalized cellular complexes. While for discrete CW complexes, the fredholm determinant is 1 or -1, in general it can now take more general values but the structures are also more strange: in the continuum much more general than CW complexes as the attached cells do not need to be bound by spheres but can be rather arbitrary.

Counting and Cohomology

There are various cohomologies for finite simplicial complexes. If the complex is the Whitney complex of a finite simple graph then many major results from Riemannian manifolds have discrete analogues. Simplicial cohomology has been constructed by Poincaré already for simplicial complexes. Since the Barycentric refinement of any abstract finite simplicial complex is always the Whitney complex of a finite simple graph, there is no loss of generality to study graphs instead of abstract simplicial complexes. This has many advantages, one of them is that graphs are intuitive, an other is that the data structure of graphs exists already in all higher order programming languages. A few lines of computer algebra system allow so to compute all cohomology groups. The matrices involved can however become large, so that alternative cohomologies are desired.

Exponential Function

We have seen that f'(x)=Df(x) = (f(x+h)-f(x))/h satisfies D[x]^n = n [x]^{n-1}.
We will often leave the constant $h$ out of the notation and use terminology like f'(x) = Df(x) for the “derivative”. It makes sense not to simplify [x]^n to $x^n$ since the algebra structure is different.

Define the exponential function as
exp(x) = \sum_{k=0}^{\infty} [x]^k/k!. It solves the equation Df=f. Because each of the approximating polynomials exp_n(x) = \sum_{k=0}^{n} [x]^k/k! is monotone and positive also exp(x) is monotone and positive for all x. The fixed point equation Df=f reads f(x+h) = f(x) + h f(x) = (1+h) f(x) so that for h=1/n we have f(x+1) = f(x+n h) = (1+h)^n f(x) = e_n f(x)
where $e_n \to e$. Because $n \to e_n$ is monotone, we see that the exponential function \exp(x) depends in a monotone manner on h and that for h \to 0 the graphs of $\exp(x)$ converge to the graph of \exp(x) as h \to 0.

Since the just defined exponential function is monotone, it can be inverted on the positive real axes. Its inverse is called \log(x). We can also define trigonometric functions by separating real and imaginary part of \exp(i x) = \cos(x) + i \sin(x). Since D\exp=\exp, these functions satisfy D\cos(x) = - \sin(x) and D\sin(x) = \cos(x) and are so both solutions to D^2 f = -f.